Cybersecurity/Legal Experience

John Welby_CYBERSECURITY and LEGAL EXPERIENCE (docx)

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Law School Curriculum

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Courses

  

Introduction to Legal Analysis I

This first-year course is designed to introduce you to the study of law and the American Legal System. It teaches you the ability to spot and analyze legal issues in factual situations. The course also introduces you to legal reasoning and legal writing.

Introduction to Legal Analysis II

This course is a continuation of CL600: Introduction of Legal Analysis I. This first-year course is designed to introduce you to the study of law and the American Legal System. It teaches you the ability to spot and analyze legal issues in factual situations. The course also introduces you to legal reasoning and legal writing.

Legal Analysis and Writing II (JD)

This course is a continuation of CL720: Legal Analysis and Writing I (JD). This course covers the practical basis of "how to" write the kinds of documents that make up a lawyer's traditional practice: a client advice letter, an office (research) memorandum, and a memorandum of law in support of - or in opposition to - a dispositive motion, for example, a Motion for Summary Judgment. The course will also include an oral argument.

Legal Analysis and Writing II (EJD)

This course is a continuation of CL725: Legal Analysis and Writing I (EJD). This legal writing and analysis course will teach you how to synthesize complex information, analyze and formulate strategy, and predict outcomes in client letters and office memorandums. You will learn to communicate in "plain English" to avoid legalese, unnecessary jargon, and other styles that call attention to the writing itself or in other ways obscure or detract attention from the meaning. You will develop professional skills and values pertinent to legal analysis.

Legal Analysis and Writing

This course teaches you how to synthesize complex information, analyze and formulate strategy, predict outcomes, and advocate for a client. You will develop objective and persuasive writing skills and ethical values in legal writing. The course covers the client interview, letters and other communications, and a pretrial brief.

Advanced Legal Analysis and Writing - Regulatory and Transactional

This course teaches you how to analyze and write in legal and professional fields. You will develop skills and ethical values in analyzing issues using objective and persuasive writing. Course projects will provide instruction and practice in advanced writing skills that are useful to anyone in legal and professional fields, such as drafting of an employee handbook provision, evaluation of a settlement offer, and regulatory analysis.

Advanced Legal Analysis and Writing - Litigation

This course gives you an opportunity to practice analysis and writing in the context of a variety of tasks in which litigators typically engage. You will develop skills and ethical values in formulating legal strategy; drafting legal documents to file with a court, including a brief; and presenting an oral argument.

Electronic Legal Research

This course focuses on research skills and techniques, including the use of an online library. You will learn to plan the research process, evaluate research resources, find relevant legal authorities, and evaluate the weight of authority.

Contract Drafting

A lawyer once said, "Legal drafting is legal thinking made visible." The drafter's work makes explicit the parties' understanding of the deal, but also fills the "gaps" sometimes left in contract negotiations and anticipates problems that might arise in the future. This course uses contract drafting to (1) exemplify the principles of contract law; (2) illustrate those principles in a planning context rather than a litigation context; and (3) develop the legal skills of reading, writing, and analysis. Through a series of readings and drafting exercises, you will learn to analyze and draft contracts that accomplish the particular needs and objectives of your client.

Intellectual Property

This is a survey course in the field of intellectual property law. Topics that are covered include examination of the statutory basis and rationale for protection of inventions (patents), creative works (copyright), and brands (trademarks). The course will include review of the processes involved in obtaining federal protection of intellectual property and the threshold criteria for qualifying for such protection. The enforcement of intellectual property rights will also be discussed, including where subject matter and personal jurisdiction may be found.

Cyber Law

This broad survey course is designed to explore the legal, ethical, and technological issues involved in cyberspace. Topics will include: Internet history, policy development, governance, and regulation; jurisdiction; First Amendment and privacy; copyright and fair use; and trademark. The course lends itself to active discussion of issues. Discussion may require additional research and bluebook citation and, to promote active discussion, will have deadlines.

Cybersecurity Law

Cybersecurity law is a complex area of practice that is likely to expand and evolve. This course will provide insights into data security law, data breach notification laws, privacy law as it applies to cybersecurity, antihacking law, and government surveillance law. Laws discussed will include HIPAA, HITECH, FERPA, and GLBA. Skills practiced in this course will include writing, analysis, and research.

Contracts I

This course examines the legal theories and principles relating to parties and agreements and their resultant obligations or benefits. Covered topics include: formation, conditions, and remedies of contracts; bargained-for consideration; third-party contracts (including assignments and delegations); statute of frauds; parole evidence; impossibility of performance; and frustration of purpose.

Contracts II

This course is a continuation of CL610: Contracts I. This course examines the legal theories and principles relating to parties and agreements and their resultant obligations or benefits. Covered topics include: formation, conditions, and remedies of contracts; bargained-for consideration; third-party contracts (including assignments and delegations); statute of frauds; parole evidence; impossibility of performance; and frustration of purpose.

Torts I

This course explores the study of civil liability relating to intentional acts and violation of duties imposed by law. In addition, legal wrongs committed by a private person upon the person or property of another independent of a contractual relationship are covered in detail in this course. Topics include intentional torts, negligence, strict liability, product liability, nuisance, defamation, invasion of privacy, and misrepresentation.

Torts II

This course is a continuation of CL620: Torts I. This course explores the study of civil liability relating to intentional acts and violation of duties imposed by law. In addition, legal wrongs committed by a private person upon the person or property of another independent of a contractual relationship are covered in detail in this course. Topics include intentional torts, negligence, strict liability, product liability, nuisance, defamation, invasion of privacy, and misrepresentation.

Criminal Law I

This course examines the state's ability to punish individuals for wrongs committed. Homicide, theft (including robbery and burglary), assault, rape, kidnapping, and arson as well as attempts, conspiracies, and solicitation are covered in depth. The state of mind required to commit a crime, including justifications and excuses, is thoroughly covered.

Criminal Law II

This course is a continuation of CL630: Criminal Law I. This course examines the state's ability to punish individuals for wrongs committed. Homicide, theft (including robbery and burglary), assault, rape, kidnapping, and arson as well as attempts, conspiracies, and solicitation are covered in depth. The state of mind required to commit a crime, including justifications and excuses, is thoroughly covered.

Constitutional Law I

This course examines the organization and framework of the federal government, the distribution of political and governmental authorities and functions, and the fundamental principles that regulate the relationship between the government and its citizens. Specific topics include the source of judicial review, the powers of legislative and executive branches, the authority reserved for the states, due process, equal protection, and First Amendment freedoms.

Constitutional Law II

This course is a continuation of CL650: Constitutional Law I. This course examines individual rights under the United States Constitution that impose limitations on governmental power. Specific topics include due process, equal protection, and First Amendment freedoms.

Real Property I

The law governing all aspects of real property and the creation of rights is the focus of this course. Additional topics include ownership rights (including present estates), co-tenancy, future interests, and the relations between landlord and tenant. Real property contracts, statute of fraud problems, real property mortgages, conveyancing, and adverse possession are also discussed.

Real Property II

This course is a continuation of CL660: Real Property I. The law governing all aspects of real property and the creation of rights is the focus of this course. Additional topics include ownership rights (including present estates), co-tenancy, future interests, and the relations between landlord and tenant. Real property contracts, statute of fraud problems, real property mortgages, conveyancing, and adverse possession are also discussed.

Civil Procedure I

Access to the U.S. court system is the focus of this course. Proper jurisdiction and venue (including long-arm statutes and minimum contacts) are covered in detail. Other topics include pleadings, joinder of parties and claims, class actions, discovery, summary judgment, directed verdict, res judicata, collateral estoppel, and the appeal process.

Civil Procedure II

This course is a continuation of CL670: Civil Procedure I. This course addresses the requirements of the civil litigation process in federal courts. These requirements come from the United States Constitution, federal statutes, and the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. This course covers answers and amendments to complaints, choice of law, discovery, summary judgment, judgment as a matter of law, jury trials, preclusion, and touches on appellate review. As part of the course, you will draft an answer to a complaint, discovery requests, and a motion for summary judgment with a memorandum of law.

Criminal Procedure II

This course is a continuation of CL680: Criminal Procedure I. This course focuses on the law governing the rights of the accused. The topics of arrest, search, seizure, confession and self-incrimination, police lineups, and ineffective assistance of counsel are covered in detail.

Criminal Procedure

This course focuses on the law governing the rights of the accused. The topics of arrest, search and seizure (Fourth Amendment), confession and self-incrimination (Fifth Amendment), police lineups, sentencing and the death penalty (Eighth Amendment), and the right to counsel (Fifth and Sixth Amendments) are covered in detail.

Evidence I

This course covers the substance of and means by which alleged matters of fact are proved or disproved in court. Central topics include the requirements for the introduction and impeachment of evidence, relevancy, character evidence, expert testimony, privileges, and hearsay. The course also covers the roles of judges and juries in the evaluation of evidence.

Professional Responsibility

The law relating to the ethical standards that govern attorneys and judges is the focus of this course. It covers the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct, the ABA Model Code of Judicial Conduct, and some California Rules of Professional Conduct. The course will also include materials on professional conduct of the attorney, the role of a lawyer, the lawyer as an officer of the court, and the relationship of the lawyer to society.

Cross Professional Ethics

This course focuses on fundamental, contemporary ethical questions in the practice of law and examines the basic premises underlying the lawyer-client relationship and some of the duties of lawyers including duties to clients, the public, the courts, and other professionals. It also compares the ethics of the legal profession with other professions. The course incorporates various forms of media to illustrate ethical dilemmas in everyday professional life, including presentations, web resources, and print media.

Remedies I

This course reviews both legal and equitable remedies, focusing on the underlying liability theories that give rise to the remedy and the remedy itself. Special attention is given to contract and tort remedies. Students will be exposed to the types of problems that they may encounter in law practice, with particular emphasis on ones that cross a variety of disciplines. Final papers are similar to the performance tests currently administered by the State Bar of California.

Remedies II

This course is a continuation of CL770: Remedies I. This course reviews both legal and equitable remedies, focusing on the underlying liability theories that give rise to the remedy and the remedy itself. Special attention is given to contract and tort remedies. Students will be exposed to the types of problems that they may encounter in law practice, with particular emphasis on ones that cross a variety of disciplines. Final papers are similar to the performance tests currently administered by the State Bar of California.

CyberSecurity Capabilities

All-In-One Virtual Security Architecture Security Pod 

SD-WAN BGP Virtual Simulation Tool (JPG)

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Technology capabilities

Virtual Internet Routing Lab is a network design and simulation environment that includes a graphical user interface, to build virtual network topologies.  VIRL can scale to support simulation & testing of an organization's global network.

MANGO (docx)

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